Cooking with Quinoa

Trying a new whole grain can be intimidating, especially when the name is difficult to pronounce. Quinoa (pronounced keen-wa) is a grain growing in popularity due to its nutritional value. Quinoa has more fiber and twice as much protein as any other grain. It can be used in a variety of dishes including burgers, stir-fries, breakfast bowls and even pizza crust.

Today’s recipe uses quinoa, black beans and cottage cheese. I love making this for on-the-road meals. These would also be a great option for kiddos who are in sports activities and need a quick meal before practice. You can freeze the mini cakes for up to 3 months and use them as needed. So instead of driving through the fast food line, grab a protein packed Quinoa Cake! Enjoy!

 

Protein Packed Quinoa Cakes
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These savory cakes are a great option for dinner on the run.
Servings Prep Time
12 20
Cook Time
20
Servings Prep Time
12 20
Cook Time
20
Protein Packed Quinoa Cakes
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
These savory cakes are a great option for dinner on the run.
Servings Prep Time
12 20
Cook Time
20
Servings Prep Time
12 20
Cook Time
20
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place 12 liners in a muffin tin and spray with cooking spray
  2. Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Stir in quinoa. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook until the grains are tender and fluffy. Let cool for about 10 minutes and transfer to a large bowl.
  3. Add eggs, beans, cottage cheese, scallions, flour, baking powder, salt and spices. Stir until combined. Fold in shredded cheese.
  4. Bake the cakes until slightly brown on top (20-25 minutes). Let cool for 5-10 minutes. Serve with your favorite salsa and avocado.
Recipe Notes

Serving Size: 1 single cake

Calories: 100, Total Fat 2.5g, Saturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 35mg, Sodium 250mg, Total Carbohydrate 12g, Dietary Fiber 2g, Protein 8g

Recipe adapted from Eating Well

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Use Your Brain, Go for Whole Grains!

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Courtesy of https://bearygoodstuff.wordpress.com/

There is a lot of controversy in the media over whole grains. Some wonder whether or not they will cause weight gain, and what the health benefits are. Labels can even make it difficult to identify a whole grain. Whole grains are an important part of a nutritious diet and there are many benefits that whole grains can provide to your health. Let’s go over the basics: whole grains vs. refined grains, how much you need, and where you can find it.

Whole grains vs. Refined grains

Whole grains are grains which have not gone through the milling process. Milling removes most of the nutrients in a grain including fiber, B vitamins, Vitamin E and minerals (aka all the good stuff).

Refined grains have been stripped from the bran and germ. Products of refined grains are white flour, white rice and many packaged products. Refined grains are used often in processed foods due to their longer shelf life. [Read more…]

Ways to Reduce Liquid Calories

Have you rethought any of your drinks this week? For a healthy weight, it is important to balance physical activity with food and beverage intakeScreen Shot 2015-04-15 at 10.44.05 AM, but many of us do not realize how many calories we are getting just from liquids. Beware of juice, soft drinks, sweetened teas, fruit drinks and sports and energy drinks. They are usually loaded with added sugar and empty calories.  Juice? This may be a surprise for some, but too much of a good thing is possible.  The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends a maximum of 4-6 oz of juice a day. Usually when a person orders juice it comes in a 16 oz glass (which is over 200 calories).  A better option would be to eat the actual fruit and you get the benefits of phytonutrients and fiber.

Another sabotager is coffee drinks. One medium frozen frappuccino can range anywhere from 250-450 calories and 15g of fat. That is equivalent to eating 3 1/2 twinkies! You don’t have to completely give up your coffee, choose options of reduced fat milk or a smaller size. Watch the video below on how to make a lower calorie latte using a glass jar and your microwave. Not only does this method save you calories it also keeps money in your pocket ($3.45 vs $0.50). So the next time you are choosing a beverage, look at the nutrition label or choose a nice cool glass of water. Enjoy!!

Note: Skim milk foams better than 1% or 2% milk. Remember- always remove metal lid when putting the  jar in the microwave.

Rethink Your Drink

Day-beverages
Picture courtesy of extension.org

Have you ever wondered how many calories are in your morning cup of coffee, juice, soda or evening cocktail? We sometimes forget to look at liquids when evaluating our diets. Liquid calories can add up fast.
In a previous post, we discussed the components of losing weight (remember that equation – burn more calories than you consume)?  [Read more…]

Throwback Thursday

You are in for a special treat! We found the FIRST Dinner Tonight video and thought it was appropriate for today’s “Throwback Thursday.” Dana Tarter was a Family and Consumer Sciences AgriLife Extension agent in Tarrant County when she was the first star of Dinner Tonight. The program has grown tremendously since this video and we are excited for what is to come. Don’t forget to try Lemon Butter Fish for dinner tonight. Enjoy! [Read more…]